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Added 11 April 2023

These resources include information on how to support people who may be at risk of suicide. These are designed for anyone who wants to improve the support they or their organisation offer.

Resources for organisations developing procedures and good practice examples can be found via our landing page, Suicide Prevention and Postvention.

If
you
are
concerned
about
someone's
immediate
safety
(i.e.
they
are
actively
suicidal),
dial
999
for
an
ambulance
or
 go
directly
to
the
nearest
A&E
department.

These three resources: card, flyer and leaflet are printable resources for homelessness services.

Steps
to
support
someone
with
suicidal
feelings

More detail on these steps can be found in the leaflet 'Supporting someone with suicidal thoughts'.

1. Notice
the
warning
signs
and
reach
out
to
the
person

It
can
be
very
difficult
for
someone
to
ask
for
support,
so
if
you
no ce
any
changes
in
 someone's
behaviour
don't
wait,
instead
ask
the
person
how
they
are
feeling.


2. Actively
listen
to
the
person
and
explore
how
they
 are
feeling

Allow
the
person
to
talk
freely
about
their
thoughts,
listen
actively
to
what
they
are
telling
you
and
ask
open‑ended
questions
to
be er
understand
 their
situa on.


3. Validate
their
emotions

Don't
dismiss
people's
distress
and
always
validate
their
feelings.


4. Reassure
them
that
they
remain
in
control
of
their
life

Be
mindful
that
the
person
may
be
afraid
that
their
freedom
and
options
 will
be
removed
by
disclosing
suicidal
thoughts.

5. Signpost
them
to
services
and
provide
information

Call
999
if
the
person
is
in
immediate
danger.


6. Follow‑up
with
them

It's
everyone's
responsibility
to
act
when
you've
been
made
aware
of
someone's
suicidal
feelings.


7. Be
human

If
you
are
working
or
volunteering
for
an
organisation,
chances
are
there
will
 be
protocols
for
you
to
follow
if
someone
discloses
suicidal
feelings.
You
can
still
follow
them
whilst
being
sensi ve
and
caring.

8. Looking
after
yourself

Hearing
about
someone's
suicidal
thoughts
and
feelings
is
never
easy,
no
 matter
how
many
times
you've
heard
it
in
the
past.
Make
sure
you
look
after
yourself
too
and
seek
support
if
you
need
it.

How to get emergency mental health support in a crisis

A client has come to you with suicidal thoughts. Where it has been possible, you have explored their risk of suicidality using gentle but direct questions.

This leaflet focuses on what you can do next to get support from mental health professionals.

Find out more
Individual in front of house

Talk To Us

6M5A1791-Edit

Jo Prestidge

Head of National Practice Development

Jo is Head of National Practice Development at Homeless Link.